neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

(via anthrocentric)

neurosciencenews:

Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks
Read the full article Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks at NeuroscienceNews.com.
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin.
The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)
Research: “Slow and Fast Gamma Rhythms Coordinate Different Spatial Coding Modes in Hippocampal Place Cells” by Kevin Wood Bieri, Katelyn N. Bobbitt, and Laura Lee Colgin in Neuron. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.03.013
Image: Place cells in the hippocampus provide a neuronal code for specific locations in space. Place cells codes represent upcoming locations at some times and reflect recently visited locations at other times. The findings by Bieri and colleagues show that place cells predict upcoming locations during periods of slow gamma rhythms and encode recently visited locations during periods of fast gamma rhythms. Credit Juliette Pepperell.

neurosciencenews:

Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks

Read the full article Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks at NeuroscienceNews.com.

Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: “Slow and Fast Gamma Rhythms Coordinate Different Spatial Coding Modes in Hippocampal Place Cells” by Kevin Wood Bieri, Katelyn N. Bobbitt, and Laura Lee Colgin in Neuron. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.03.013

Image: Place cells in the hippocampus provide a neuronal code for specific locations in space. Place cells codes represent upcoming locations at some times and reflect recently visited locations at other times. The findings by Bieri and colleagues show that place cells predict upcoming locations during periods of slow gamma rhythms and encode recently visited locations during periods of fast gamma rhythms. Credit Juliette Pepperell.

policymic:

American’s predictions and wants for the future

 A new report from Pew Research Center indicates that while most Americans anticipate great technological changes in the next few decades, many have doubts that new inventions and advances will help humanity in the long run.

In general, 59% of the 1,000 participants interviewed said technological changes would lead to a better future, while 30% said things would get worse. Many said they expected revolutionary advances in the next 50 years, such as lab-grown organ transplants.

Read more

(via s-c-i-guy)

(via london-re)

(via brainsx)

neurosciencenews:

Rapid Whole Brain Imaging with Single Cell Resolution

Read the full article Rapid Whole Brain Imaging with Single Cell Resolutionat NeuroscienceNews.com.

In collaboration with several Japanese institutes, researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan demonstrate an easy and fast way to achieve whole brain imaging for 3D analysis of gene expression profiles and neural circuits at the systems level.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “Whole-brain imaging with single-cell resolution using chemical cocktails and computational analysis” by Etsuo A. Susaki, Kazuki Tainaka, Dimitri Perrin, Fumiaki Kishino, Takehiro Tawara, Tomonobu M. Watanabe, Chihiro Yokoyama, Hirotaka Onoe, Megumi Eguchi, Shun Yamaguchi, Takaya Abe, Hiroshi Kiyonari, Yoshihiro Shimizu, Atsushi Miyawaki, Hideo Yokota and Hiroki R. Ueda. in Cell. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.042

Image: A mouse brain before (left) and after (right) clearing with aminoalcohols. Credit Susaki et al/RIKEN/Cell.

You can see it in their eyes.

(via mygreenteacups)

(via duck426)

jtotheizzoe:

Through the Looking Glass, Into the Brain

Book review! I just read Neurocomic (Amazon), a new graphic novel by Drs. Hana Ros & Matteo Farinella (who is on Tumblr). While not perfect, it presents the history and science of brain research in a way I’ve never before seen. I wish there was more of this art/science crossover in science books, don’t you?

Neurocomic is one man’s Lewis Carroll-esque journey through the human brain (his own?), where, after becoming trapped in a daydream, he encounters micro-avatars of the very neuroscientists who first unlocked the secrets of neuroscience. He also gets some rather psychedelic biology lessons along the way, falling through axons, parachuting out of synaptic vesicles, fighting the Kraken (who I assume has come for revenge on all that giant squid axon research that scientists have done over the years), discovering the power of hallucinogens (the hard way… no, make that the FUN way), and even breaking up some fisticuffs between Messrs. Golgi and Ramon y Cajal.

But like any book that attempts to hit every highlight of neuroscience, as well as the people who have studied it, in less than 150 pages, it was often superficial, and I was left wanting in parts. This book’s a bit like the cerebral cortex in that way: Interesting and full of action, but ultimately concealing a lot of cool stuff going on underneath. While the text was a bit academic in parts, the illustrations are superb, both fantastic and fantastical. I half expected the Cheshire Cat to pop up (instead I got a talking version of Pavlov’s dog).

Neurocomic won’t leave you ready to enter a neuroscience PhD program, but it does present some amazing science in a genre-busting, outlandish, imaginative way. All in all, journey through the looking glass into an imaginary world inside our own minds. And isn’t that what reading a story is all about?